Alexis Hinde

 

Alexis Hinde

Alexis Hinde is an Assistant Business Agent with the Directors Guild of Canada, British Columbia. She publishes a bi-weekly column entitled Debunking Collective Agreement Myths with Alexis Hinde for the DGC BC's Newsletter to Members and can be seen out on set visits. If you see her, make sure to say hello!

Debunking Collective Agreement Myths: Associate vs. Full Member

Today marks three years that I've been on staff with the Guild, after 12 years as a Member. Can I just tell you how much I love my job? I LOVE MY JOB; representing Members, set visits, assisting with questions and concerns, advocating on your behalf with Employers and working collaboratively with the other unions on initiatives like calltimementalhealth.com--I genuinely love working here at the Guild. And it's been wonderful to see so many of you in the office picking up Arcteryx sweaters this week!

 I couldn't be happier to be here, is what I'm saying.

 Now, the question for this week:

 There's some confusion among the Membership about the difference between Associate Members and Full Members, and who can work in which positions with or without a permit. It's actually really simple:

 A Member is a Member is a Member. Whether Full Member or Associate Member, any Member in Good Standing can work in any category. Once you're a Member of the DGC, you can work in any DGC category anywhere in the country. There is no restriction or permit required for an Associate Member to work as Location Scout, Background Coordinator, 3rd AD, ALM, etc. If an Associate Member is hired in a department head position (PM, LM, 1st AD) the production must notify the Guild. That's it!

(Logbook Holders, on the other hand, while on the path to membership, are not Members yet. Permit requests MUST be submitted in advance of engagement for any Logbook Holder to work in any Member category - that is, Key PA on up.)

As far as the Collective Agreement and our Bylaws are concerned, the only difference between a Full Member and an Associate Member is the right to vote at membership meetings, what categories can be listed under on the avails list, and the amount paid in annual dues. There is no difference from a hiring perspective.

Any questions? 
Any Collective Agreement myths you'd like to see addressed in future notes from me? 
Email me! ahinde@dgcbc.com